The roofing project of the Dallas Scottish Rite Museum and Library required a very well-thought-out plan. Due to the location of the museum, a specific safety strategy was put in place that required the use of a 290-ton crane in the middle of the night to avoid downtown Dallas traffic, as well as the installation of a safety guard rail system around the perimeter.

John Ewell, CEO of DFW Urethane, joins us to share his experience throughout the roofing project.

When the roof was damaged by hail, it actually broke the elastomeric rubber coating on the top of the polyurethane foam. We scarfed off the top layer of the damaged coating, and we applied a primer to it and then sprayed additional polyurethane foam over the top of it to get us an R25.

We came back and sprayed three coats of the elastomeric rubber coating over the top. And this is a gray aliphatic coating that we used, and it’s very close to the original color that we can find on a lot of old pictures. And it will hold up long term, so we thought that was just ideal.

We’re over the auditorium. This roof had an architectural standing seam metal roof. We couldn’t scarf this roof because of the standing seam metal. So, we put two inches of ISO board down and mechanically fastened over the standing seam roof, and then sprayed an additional, about two and a half inches of spray foam over the top of the ISO board.

And then we put the coating systems over the top of that. The gutter and this spacer were all replaced. This was very difficult to spray under these units. It was just cost prohibitive to take the units off this building.

So we had to come underneath these units. As you can see that big piece of metal in there. We had to work under it and get all this sprayed in place. We did just the very best we could, but it is watertight, and that is because that was our goal.